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Halcyon 

Volume I, 1968 

William Rainey Harper College 

Palatine/ Elk Grove, Illinois 



. ♦ . dedication 



Peace . . . poems are composed praising it, 

songs are sung advocating it, marches are staged 

pleading for it, and prayers are offered in hopes 

of finding it. Peace is that intangible ideal that we 

try to make visible through understanding. 

Without it, we cannot hope to have a future. 

We of the 1968 HAM 'YON staff wish to dedicate our 

first publication, just as we should all dedicate our lives, 

to the quest for peace through understanding . . . 

understanding of others stemmed through the 

understanding of ourselves. Only by first discovering 

who we are can we then understand who others are. 

If dedication to understanding is affirmed, 
the serenity of peace can be manifested. 




Photographed by 
Roland G. Soorus 



right: 

Dr. Robert E. Lahti 
President 




Dr. Herbert R. Pankratz 
Dean of Instruction 



Dr. James Harvey 
Dean of Students 





In the beginning... 







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. . . AND THERE WAS ... A NEED . . . AN IDEA . . . A PLAN . . . 

1965 . . . AND A FORCE OF ENERGY PREVAILED . . . AND IT 

WAS A COLLEGE ABSORBING ITSELF IN THE FABRIC OF 

SUBURBIA . . . 1966 

Momentum mounts, 

additional considerations become paramount . 

Planners, architects, engineers, 

high hopes, impatience, the dollar estimate — 

Each a contributing factor to site selection for 
a college. 

Then, organizational guidelines: 

policies, procedures, curriculum, finance. 

An educational planning team at work. 

DR. ROBERT E. LAHTI, President 






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William Raine^Hiw^®^ 

COLLE 










A field of weeds . . . 

produces a developer of minds 






Fred Vaisvil 
Director of Placement and Student Aids 



Donn Stansbury 
Director of Admissions and Registrar 





John H. Upton 

Director of Instructional Development 

and Community Relations 



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****** 



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Robert Powell 
Division Chairman of Communications 



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S 



John Thompson 
Division Chairman of Science and Mathematics 



John Birkholz 

Division Chairman of Business and Social Science 




Dr. G. Kenneth Andeen 
Assistant Dean of Transfer Programs 



Harold C. Cunningham 
Assistant Dean of Career Programming 




*8^ ... 



Dr. Frank Vandever 
Coordinator of Dental Hygiene 




William Punkay 
Coordinator of Mechanical Design 




Richard Wild 
Coordinator of Law Enforcement 




Roger Mussell 
Coordinator of Electronics Technology 




Donald Misic 
Purchasing Agent 



Anton Dolejs 
Comptroller 





William Mann 
Dean of Business Affairs 



11 




Clete Hinton, Assistant Professor 





Miss Anna Marie Bazik, Instructor 



In the multitude of counsellors there is safety. 

Proverbs XI, 14 



Dr. Thomas Seward. Director of Counseling 




* is. ' 





Mrs. Muriel Reffelt and Miss Sefrie 
Secretaries 




Miss Bazik, Hinton, and Raymond Hylander, 
Assistant Professor 



12 



■:.**■ -.-, $&*%■ '^^Jfc? 







FACULTY 



1. 


L. 


Collister. Mathematics 


2 


M. 


Bartos. English 


3. 


J. 


Urbanski, English 


4. 


T. 


Zimanzl, English 


5. 


Di 


. B. Enbysk, Geology 


6. 


R. 


Sedrel, Data Processing 


7. 


\\ 


. Punkay, Mechanical Design 


8. 


W 


. Foust, Art 


9. 


R. 


Trunk, Business 


10. 


M. 


Dugan. Nursing 


11. 


A. 


Bazik. Counselor 


12. 


R. 


Wild. Law Enforcement 


13. 


D. 


Misic. Purchasing 


14. 


J. 


Thompson, Biology 


15. 


J. 


Clouser. Chemistry 


16. 


K. 


Parker, Data Processing 


17. 


H. 


Cunningham. Careers 


18. 


I. 


Sanderson, French 


19. 


A. 


Easterly. Library 


20. 


M. 


Gant, Mathematics 



21. 


11 


Meier. German 


22. 


c. 


Falk. Business 


23. 


Di 


'. J. Harvey, Dean of Students 


24. 


T. 


McCabe, Mathematics 


25. 


J. 


Siedband. Physics 


26. 


H. 


Roepken, Journalism 


27. 


R. 


DePalma. Biology 


28. 


Di 


. H. Pankratz, Dean of Instruction 


29. 


E. 


Kalish. History 


30. 


R. 


Stewart. Sociology 


31. 


S. 


King. History 


321 


J. 


Muchmore, Speech 


33. 


R. 


Thieda. Library 


34. 


A. 


Phillips, Business 


35. 


M. 


Swanson. English 


36. 


J. 


Davis, Spanish 


37. 


R. 


Kerns, Physical Education 


38. 


D. 


Collins. Architecture 


39. 


Di 


. G. Makas. Music 


40. 


M. 


Ryan, English 



41. 


A. 


42. 


W. 


43. 


R. 


44. 


R. 


15. 


M 


46. 


J. 


47. 


R. 


48. 


R. 


49. 


M. 


50. 


F. 


51. 


Dr 



56. 

57. 
58. 
59. 

HO. 



Dolejs. Comptroller 
Miller. Biology 
Powell. English 
Lang, Data Processing 
Ostrowski, Psychology 
Singelmann, Business 
Zilkowski, Business 
Mussell, Engineering 
Bolt. Physical Education 
Vaisvil, Placement 
. T. Seward, Counseling 
J. Gelch, Physical Education 
R. Hylander, Counseling 
Dr. R. Lahti. President 
J. Knudsen, Art 

C. Hinton, Counseling 
J. Upton. Development 

Dr. K. Andeen. Liberal Arts 
J. Birkholz, Business 

D. Stansbury. Registrar 



Not pictured: M. Stevens, English & Russian; W. 
Dr. F. Vandever. Dental Hygienics. 



Mann, Dean of Business; J. Heinly, Nursing: D. Klingenberg. Bookstore: R. Hughes. Buildings and Grounds; 




14 



Up! Up! my friend, and quit your books; 
Or surely you'll grow double: 
Up! Up! my friend, and clear your looks; 
Why all this toil and trouble? 

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH 
"THE TABLES TURNED" 



Academics 




Jordan H. Siedband 

Associate Professor 

Physics 




16 




Mathematics possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty 
— a beauty cold and austere, like that of a sculpture, without 
appeal to any part of our weaker nture, sublimely pure, and 
capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can 
show. 

Bertrand Russell 



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Mary Martin Gant 
Instructor, Mathematics 



17 



Business 





Robert Zilkowski, Business Instructor 



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Data 
Processing 




19 







Joanne L. Heinly, Assistant Professor 
Nursing Program Coordinator 



Mr. Chase 
The Nurses' "Doll" 





20 




IT 



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Law 
Enforcement 



Mr. Richard Wild 
Coordinator of Law Enforcement 




21 



J am simply asking for a 
theater in which an adult 
who wants to live can find 
plays that will heighten 
his awareness of what liv- 
ing in our time involves. 

Arthur Miller 




22 



Dr. George Makas, Associate Professor 





M 

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L 
I 

B 
R 

A 
R 
Y 




Robert Thieda and Mrs. Betty Cwik 




Ambrose Easterly, Head Librarian 




24 



^&Lim&** 






Any great work of art is great because 
it creates a special world of its own. It revives 
and readapts time and space, and the measure 
of its success is the extent to which it invites 
you in and lets you breathe its strange, 
special air. 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 



William R. Foust. Art Instructor 







Studying is a lonely business. 



IW THE E¥INT OF 

ATOMIC 
ATTACK 




26 






27 




■:::. 



Social 



29 





cooperation . . 



. . . curiosity 




pressure 






Registration is. ♦ ♦ 



30 



. . . disgust 





s&ctra stKvice wk*u r 

(" WfeKAI?$ 
2 TWKW Aids 





patience 







31 




Cafeteria — 

The hub of activity 




BnNG PAPERBACKS 



■ *n • - - — * : 






33 





34 



■ 





,'••«, 



•*■/£ 







:,'.) 



. . 




H. P. Lovecraft 



and the beat goes on . . . 





The Maud* 



36 




1 




I 



Organizations 



at car?" I inquired, 
rper's car!" 

was a great help. Har- 
les aot even have a per- 
t campus. I naturally as- 

it wouldn't have a car. 
sver, my faith was shat- 

At the student services 

I was informed that 
• does have a car— and 
d one for nearly a year! 

Frances Palmer, secre- 
d Dean of Students, Dr. 

Harvey, laughed when 



I told her I wanted to do a sto- 
ry on the car. Dr. Harvey even 
allowed a chuckle to slip. 

Mrs. Palmer keeps the rec- 
ords on the car. As she 
thumbed through requisition 
slips and other data in a fat 
folder, I began to think that 
this poor vehicle was just a 
registration number and not 
a thing at all. 

The car is a Chevrolet sta- 
tion wagon that is leased for 
a two-year period from Lattof 



has popped up in such cities 
as DeKalb and Peoria, ranging 
as far as Michigan and Wis- 
consin. All trips are recorded 
in a log showing who has used 
the car and where they went. 

So the "mystery" around 
Harper's station wagon has 
been dispelled. But pvpn Hmcn 
responsible for if 
sure about it. 

Dean Harvey i 
mer still haven't 
is a 1966 or 196< 



O 



Chicago Star Qm 



The 1967 State Street Council's 
Star Queen is 17-year-old Anita 
Pankratz, daughter of Dean of 




The Harbinger 



Gary Lovell, Editor 

Sally Weiler, Executive Editor 

Bryan O'Shaughnessy, Managing Editor 

David Garland, Sports Editor 

Victor Giammarrusco, Art Editor 

Terry Babb, Business Manager 

Blair Johanson, Photo Editor 

Tom Clark, Tom Brock, Photographers 

Rena Sargis, Office Manager 

STAFF: Michael Weber, Linda Lockowitz, Joe 
Nowell, Pat Tenerowicz, Art Bracher, 
Mike Brezinski 

ADVISOR: Henry Roepken, Assistant Professor 



s or universities in mi- 
nd must be submitted to 
im mission office by 
s before Februar 
n addition to applic 
als, school couns e 
ec e i v e d informational 
5 to permit them to an- 
pecific inquiries by their 
s. The Grant Program 
monetary aid on an an- 
enewal basis to under- 
te students who are citi- 
nd residents of Illinois. 

lents n- 
i colle 

lllino 
moneta 
landatoi 

of $11 
1968-69. 
mitted 
nrolled 
> accor 
nents < 
es of t 
;e the 
m, an 
Progra. 
; in a 

nor ex* 
:hool re' ^Jr> 
tion anl I^yV : i 
standing '• 
ion in 

cademii,..rv 
its will $ 

1 need 
studen 

ation, ai 1 
mmutini 

of a s; 
nportam 
ppllcatic 

by a st 
: will be 
ity to repl] 



Phillips is a good album, but 
it is not great and that I feel 



Harperi 
Go To( 

Three Harper sj 
ed in a fight that 
alleged incidents 
lounge at Harpe: 
put under coup 
The judge ruled I 
retained a spotle: 
March 27, all ch 
dropped. 

The three Ha: 
Gil Van Raalte, B 
Carl Stevens. 

Dr. James Ha 
students, said ea: 
court action we 
college would sen| 
of warning to the 
students. 



Dave Garland, Terry Babb, and Garry Lovell 
discuss deadlines for the next . issue of the 
HARBINGER. 



cc 



of the material is either not 
very good or it is not Love- 
craft. 

"The White Ship" for ex- 
ample, is not a very good song, 
but rather an excuse for Dave 
Michael's organ and harpsi- 
cord runs. 



e four, concern- 
ent which took 
r. However, the 
arresting officer, Jose Gonzales 
of Elk Grove^y^-unahlp tn 
appear for t 




Show;" the "lightin 

Street's Christmas i 

the launching of th< 
" m -, ,. Tots „ di 

is. 

igo fire 
by "sn 
Cettle al 
:ure at 
s. With 
wand tl 
lal holid 
is under 
o's mail 
>tar Qu( 
ff the fi 
tamps. 

a troph; 
lift certi 
all, the 
, can't 



Harper College is going to 
receive some financial assist- 
ance with a new computer pro- 
«ra 



assigned William R> 
of electronic data 
for the high school 
;ri 





entirely its 

Much of 
album is fol 
craft had taJL ., 
rock, not onffW 
quality, but^ 
credence for* 

These son 
gether" "W 
and newer 
rary folk p< 
try Boy-Blei 
the Bag I'm 
the great ". 
core of Love> 

The album 
not great. Ii 
album's havi 

ture the warmth and personali- 
ty a group in 
citement it ge 
an important 
the best to c 
go. 



Asst SuDt Roderick McLennan 



Advisor Henry Roepken (right), is congratulated for progress 
achieved in the field of college publications. . 



the course "Tntrnd n 

i 



Sally Weiler calls for a story. 



Patronize 
Harper 

Friends; 
Harbinger 



process information for plan- 
ning a long-term building pro- 
gram. 

District Superintendent Ed- 
ward H. Gilbert told the board 
that he feels the school district 
should help finance the program 
because of the future benefits 
that the program would bring. 

The estimated cost of $1,200 
is based on full participation 
by the 12 elementary and high 
school districts within the Har- 
rier Coilese district. The total 



ance, and introduce 
role of the theater 

Muchmore explair 
stage facilities of E 
High School are nj 
to Harper College. 1 
eated, would bar th 
of a major produc 

He said, howevei 
dent interest would 
sible some type of 
tivity. 

This interest is c 
ine transformed in 



•ulty 'Gifts' 

ta Claus didn't forget about Harper and all 
d faculty boys and girls who have vanished 
midst scholarly pursuits. The Spirit of 
las Present dropped in at the HARBINGER 
nth a bagful of delights. The fun of pres- 
s in the sharing. So — crip in and share 
af Santa's gifts: 

President Robert Lahti a set of boxing 
a book on "Boxing — Self-Taught" and 
tation to square-off with Elk Grove high- 
jrincipal Robert Haskell . . . For Haskell 



'f inrv»iioV»/^*» Ar 



■J <*r> r» ti 4- « <•« nii ■(£ 



+ ..^CLpobf*!* « 




Bryan O'Shaughnessy, even under the pressure of a 
deadline, finds time to enjoy his work. 



G. Galin Berrier 

Coast league. 

Berrier's opportunity came in 
1962 when he was selected as 
one of 87 instructors far the 
John Hay Fellow program. This 
sends instructors to school for 
a year with all expenses paid 
plus a regular teaching salary. 
Schools like Harvard, Colum- 
bia, Northwestern and the Uni- 
versity of California at Berke- 
ley participated. 

"I chose Berkeley because it 
dirin't have snob appeal. It's 
the best university in the coun- 
least it was then," ex- 
3errier. 

learned more than 
In be squeezed from a 

rst trip to Berkeley in 
preceded the free-speech 
int. Instead of Flower 
and LSD, Beatniks 
i the campus, 
jwere searching for a 
Berrier recalled. 
[ were finding outlets 
r dissatisfaction." 
'A interest lay in such 
is as the Congress of 
Equality. Student Non- 
Coordinating Committee 
Ban-the-Bomb devotees. 
of those students of- 
nt to Arkansas during 
ns to take part in civil- 
marches aimed at in- 
n and Negro voter 
tion. 

jority of the Berkeley 
, however, were regu- 
r-sweater and "sweet- 
f Sigma Chi" types, 
returned to the Berke- 
ley campus in the summer of 
y then the Free-Speech 
ent had already flower- 



tions. 

"The man seemed rather 
naive. And when I saw him 
in a smaller group, he was 
almost shv. He smoke with 
w 
n 
h 
o 




Su'puultttn en 

med into large lecture ses- 
sions. 

He said California — like Illi- 
nois — has a powerful move- 
ment to keep freshmen and 
sophomores out of the univer- 
sities and to get them into 
two-year community colleges. 
Berrier exDlained that the 



i" ■ "injji, ii an ill [r i i i 

education, advance in 
work or just to add to 
knowledge. 

Most of these "senior 
mpja. " find th?t „ the mos 
■ mt they 
being c 
young i 
tructors 
of those 

ly have 
. utside s 
to plan 
l n d cha 
washing 
for a f; 
. or just 
a day to 
lily. 

tn, a par 
•mmentec 
t to s 
s a fami 

jomeworl 
I, omework 
is intei 
studies 
on his c 
gham 
the stu( 
don't answer; they feel 
adults should because 
(the adults) are on the I 
level as the teacher." 
Mrs. Betty Phillips may 
the answer to the reason; 
adult students generally se 
get good grades. When 
which came first with 
ork 



Two. Harper coeds vote in one of several 
HARBINGER polls. Issues that were surveyed 
ranged from legalization of marijuana to inter- 
racial dating. The HARBINGER poll allowed 
students to express their feelings on various 
timely topics. 



Sit a 
lore 



11UUI 1.1003 ■ 



1.1 IV 1 IV * 



dia ignore that and continue to 
focus on the more colorful as- 
pects of the Berkeley campus." 



Lgullull CI I V 111 IMlIlaJ, ridlLJt.I o Illcii.II™ 

faculty. The losing ticket of any numbers 
for Larew Collister . . . Mary Gant . . . 

McCabe. A stench-bomb kit for Chemis- 
iseph Clouser ... a stenographer's pad 
e Phillips, Business. 

ip to ancient Rome by non-stop .Time Ma 
)r History's Edward Kalish. A — 
e for Sherwin King. Singing li 
uchmore of Speech . . . Spanis 

German instructor Henry Meiei 
unites with an enraged bull for J^ 
. A trip to Paris, Illinois, for 
French. 

ledial reading for English instr 
Ryan . . . Marilyn Swanson . . . 
a. A ticket to a cricket match f< 
... six tons of 1963 Sunday 

on Journalism's Henry Roepker 
itation Russian cavier for June 
;less guitar for Anna Marie Baz 

. Short-change training for J 
isiness. An abacus for Roy Se< 
ing. A straight-edge for En, 

Punkay ... a course in Chinese short- 
>r Robert Zilkowski, Business. Pageless 

for Rose Trunk. Business . . . another 



TTiicago Rock Sags, 
Echoes Hollow Sound 



BOB LANE 




with a heavy accent on coun- 
try style. 

But the draft, equipment loss- 
es and a lack of large com- 



In a completely different bag, 
whose pop 
tremendous 
as brought 
pularity in- 
hit records 
dren were 
ve). 

r level of 

tckinghams, 

t achieved 

through a 

:al appeal, 

•us amount 

anber the 

I?). The lat- 

le Bucking- 

ilike nothing 

wnmercials, 

is mediocre 

in its dis- 

There are some groups in Chi- 
cago that have some measure of 
potential, but in my opinion only 



er 
ang< 

opinion about the younger 
I find them intelligent 
sincere in their beliefs." 

Peat Moss Goi 
But Not Weatl 

Harper College's new 
ture is again on solid gi 

The Corbetta Constr 
Company reported that th< 
moss deposits found on thi 
struction site have beei 
moved. 

Those deposits undei 
parking lots and under tb 
ners of two buildings 
cause a serious constructu 
lay, said Corbetta. 

The main delays have 
caused by the bad w< 
more than anything eh 
rough estimate indicates 
weather costs a week of 
struction time. 



RANDHURS1 
CAMERA SH( 

FOR Att YOUR 
CAMERA NEEDS 



HALCYON 68 



Part of college is forming traditions, and the 1968 
HALCYON staff proceeded to establish a format that 
will hold for coming years. 

Although small in number, the staff put forth a 
tremendous effort to make Harper College's first year- 
book one to be proud of. 

At the beginning of the school year, the staff spon- 
sored a campaign for art and literature to promote 
interest. 

Editor-in-chief Judy Ressler and managing editor 
Pat Tenerowicz performed the composing from organ- 
izing schedules, to writing copy, to laying out pages. 

College years are memorable, and the 1968 
HALCYON will preserve these memories for the 
students. 










Judy Ressler 

Editor-in-Chief 




1968 HALCYON Staff- 



Editor in-Chief Judy Ressler 

Managing Editor Pat Tenerowicz 

Photo Editor Jeff Cady 

Photographers Tom Brock 

Jeff Cady 
Blair Johanson 

Advisor Henry Roepken 

Assistant Professor 



Pat Tenerowicz, Managing Editor 




Advisor Henry Roepken proof-reads a copy idea. 




Photographers Jeff Cady ( left ) and Tom Brock ( below ) 




t3 



Student Government 



The Interim Student Assembly of Harper College was form- 
ed last spring. From the time of its origin, this government has 
begun to establish policies and traditions that will remain with 
future governments at the college. 

The government wrote a constitution, a set of procedures 
that will be followed by future governments. The name Student 
Senate of Harper College, or the SSHC, was officially designated 
and adopted. 

The SSHC has a long way to travel before perfection is 
reached; however, the progress made during 1967-68 will be valu- 
able in achieving its goals. 



OFFICERS 

Robert Wintz President 

Herb Baylin Vice-President 

Laurine West Secretary 

Tom Tobin Treasurer 




II 



Jerry Allen 
Deborah Berg 
Donna Berg 
Susan Bettis 
Karen Bock 
Pete Gianpetro 
Marion Gizella 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Jerry Maculitis 
James Pesz 
Mike Romaniw 
Dave Studstrup 
Pat Tenerowicz 
Pat Whitaker 
Marsha Williksen 



Dr. James Harvey, Advisor 






45 



It's Hargrove — 




— and his creator 




"From a distance, they look like a herd of mammoths! 



Vic Giammarrusco 



16 




jCone, EauLy Ag»AiV» 1>ear ? 




« 





Judo Club 




17 




Harper s snow bunnies and schuss boomers 



IS 







Harper Players 



49 




50 



t*t' 



j M 



/ 



w ** ' s i 2 

J* It*' 






I 




Sports 




*»■ 




. 



: 




52 




Elk Grove Bowl served as the scene 
for physical education students en- 
rolled in bowling classes. 





53 



I 



o -i 



i 







•* • 







tf 



* 



1 




.-./ 



/ 
•' 






• 



55 







.v; 





The Baby Bulls, intramural play-off championship team 




57 




Left to right: 

Roy G. Kearns 

Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Martha L. Bolt 

Instructor, Physical Education 

John A. Gelch 

Assistant Professor, Physical Education 







58 





,zm- 







59 




A conglomeration of: 
stubbled faces 
saggy eyes and 
stale mouths. 
Meshed together, 
facing their reflection. 
Trying to rid themselves 
of the pillage of 
the Sandman. 



Linda Lockowitz 





60 



seconds 

minutes, hours 

days, weeks, months, years 

have passed since 

our existence was conceived 

tears, blood, sweat 

pain, confusion and 

brainwashing 

have shaped our personalities and 

molded our minds 

maturity must go 

with age — a rule of thumb 

older now 

how many prejudices have we 

developed 

how much more hate 

have we gained? 



■Janet Lvnn -Jones 









61 




>T 




Mrs. Frances Palmer 
Secretary to the Dean of Students 



Mrs. Mary Buchheit 

Mrs. Virginia Kuykendall 

Miss Mary Ellen Grimes 





Mrs. Carolyn Gosser 
Secretary to the Assistant Dean of Liberal Arts 



Secretaries 



Mrs. Joyce Anderson 
Admissions 







Miss Jane Spore 

Miss Bobbie Adams 

Miss Colleen Freeman 




Mrs. Marie Dahlgren 
Placement and Student Aids 



62 




Miss Suellvn Collins 





Mrs. Mary Buchheit 
Secretary to the Chairman of Science and Mathematics 



left: 

Mrs. Kathy Smictanski 
Secretary to the Assistant Dean of Careers 



right: 
Mrs. Janet Swanson 
Secretary to the Dean of Instruction 




.,M 









Mrs. Dorothy Decker 




Mrs. Doloris Johnson 



Mrs. Iris Hippie 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

On behalf of the 1968 HALCYON staff, I wish 
to thank: 

Corbetta Construction Company for pictures 
of the Harper campus 

Roland Soorus for his photography 

Tom Brock and Carl Sorenson, photographers 

Mr. Blackwell and Mr. Jernigan of Paddock 
Publications for their advice and assistance 

And special thanks to our advisor Henry 
Roepken and our photo editor Jeff Cady. 
Without their valuable assistance there 
would have been no HALCYON . 



Judy Ressler, Editor 






^£jkKW.